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Daniel Earl (died 1790) was an Ireland-born Anglican clergyman and missionary for the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel. In 1757, Earl (also spelled Earle) was sent to the Albemarle Region of provincial North Carolina where he served as… Read More

Gromalin Earls was a resident in colonial North Carolina. Around 1763, he joined others in signing a letter of petition to royal governor Arthur Dobbs on behalf of William Strother, who had been accused of horse stealing.

Benjamin Early was an African American man born in Virginia in 1826. A resident of Peoria, Peoria county, Illinois by 1880, he was a teamster and a fireman. Died October 12, 1886. 

Thomas Archibald Early was born on July 23, 1887, in North Carolina. Early was chief of police for the town of Badin, North Carolina, from April 1918 to October 1925. In 1919, he provided testimony in an investigation into the alleged abuse of… Read More

James Stanislaus Easby-Smith was born on May 17, 1870, in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Easby-Smith was an attorney who served as a legal advisor to Provost Marshal General Enoch H. Crowder during World War I. He aided in the revisal of the classification… Read More

Peter Lassett [last name unclear] was a resident of Bertie County. In 1778 he signed an oath swearing his allegiance to the State of North Carolina and promised to report any treasonous conspiracies that might threaten North Carolina's… Read More

Abner Eason (d. 1794) was a resident of Bertie County who served as a justice for the Bertie… Read More

George Eason (d. 1802) was a resident of Chowan and later Gates County. In 1778 he refused to take an oath swearing his allegiance to the State of North Carolina, but he continued to live in the state after the war.

Jacob Eason was a resident of Chowan County. In 1777 he served as a grand juror in the fall session of the … Read More

Levi Eason (d. 1805) was a resident of Chowan and later Gates County. In 1778 he refused to take an oath swearing his allegiance to the State of North Carolina, but he continued to live in the state after the war.

Seth Eason (d. 1802) was a resident of Chowan and later Gates County. In 1778 he signed an oath swearing his allegiance to the State of North Carolina and promised to report any treasonous conspiracies that might threaten North Carolina's… Read More

Thomas Eastrig was a resident in colonial North Carolina. Around 1763, he joined others in signing a letter of petition to royal governor Arthur Dobbs on behalf of William Strother, who had been accused of horse stealing.

John Eaton was a noted carriage maker and local office holder in the town of Halifax, NC. He is not to be confused with his son, John Henry Eaton, the Jacksonian Democrat.

The Ebbitt Boarding House was founded in 1856, in Washington D.C. by William E. Ebbitt. The boarding house moved to various locations throughout the city, and eventually turned into Washington's first saloon. Due to it's location near the White… Read More

Plato Durham Ebbs was born in Madison County, North Carolina, on September 13, 1881. Ebbs was proprietor of Ebbs Brothers grocery company in Madison County from 1901 to 1945. He served as a legislator (elected 1915, 1923, 1925, & 1927) and as… Read More

Henry Eborn settled in colonial North Carolina by 1701. In 1704 he and several other colonists near present-day Bath submitted a petition against the Mattamuskeet. He died in Beaufort County, North Carolina in 1733.

James Dixon Eckles was born in Petersburg, Virginia on August 19, 1874. After studying law at Washington and Lee University, Eckles lived in Norfolk before moving his legal practice to Black Mountain (Buncombe County) in 1909. Eckles served as… Read More

Charles Eden was an English member of the gentry who was born in 1673 and arrived in North Carolina to accept his appointment as the colony's governor in 1714. He was best known for being governor during the "Golden Age of Piracy," and some of… Read More

John Edey was a resident of Chowan County. In 1778 he signed an oath swearing his allegiance to the State of North Carolina and promised to report any treasonous conspiracies that might threaten North Carolina's independence.

Richard Edgcumbe (1716-1761), 2nd Baron Edgecumbe, was a British politician who served as a lord of Trade (1754-1755) and as lord of Admiralty (1755-1756).

Richard Edge was a resident of Albemarle County, North Carolina by 1684. That year he was accused of taking an American Indian's gun and ordered to produce and return the weapon to the court. Any further information about this individual has not… Read More

George Franklin Edmunds was born in Richmond, Vermont on February 1, 1828. Edmunds was an attorney and Republican politician who served in the U.S. Senate for Vermont from 1866 to 1891. He died in Pasadena, California on February 27, 1919.

Arnold Edwards was a resident in colonial North Carolina. Around 1763, he joined others in signing a letter of petition to royal governor Arthur Dobbs on behalf of William Strother, who had been accused of horse stealing.

Britain Edwards was a resident of Pitt and later Edgecombe County. In 1777 he served on a jury of inquest that determined that … Read More

Gaston Alonzo Edwards was born on April 12, 1875, in Chatham County, North Carolina. Edwards was the first Black architect licensed in North Carolina. He served as president of Kittrell College from 1917 to 1929. Edwards died in Durham (Durham… Read More

James Edwards was born in about 1778 in Bedford County, Virginia. The son of a Revolutionary War veteran, he served in a North Carolina unit during the War of 1812. He died in Yancey County, North Carolina on November 11, 1823.

James L. Edwards was born in Petersburg, Virginia on May 25, 1786. A colonel in the U.S. Marine Corps during the War of 1812, he later worked as a clerk in the U.S. War Department, where he often worked on pensions cases. When the pension office… Read More

John Edwards was born in Baltimore, Maryland in September 1750. As a child he moved from Maryland to Hanover, Pennsylvania, and then to the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia. By 1771, John Edwards lived in Bedford County, Virginia, where he married… Read More

John Saunders Edwards was born in Leesburg, Loudoun County, Virginia on February 12, 1812. A resident of Washington, DC, he worked as a lawyer and helped process pension claims and other federal suits for clients around the country. He died in… Read More

Joseph Jackson Edwards was born on September 11, 1867, in Scott County, Virginia. Edwards was a Methodist minister who served various communities in North Carolina, including Taylorsville and Murphy. He died in Murphy on December 7, 1937.

Louisa M. Daniel was born in Orange County, North Carolina. In 1856 she married Thomas H. Edwards, a Methodist minister. The couple had three children together, two of which survived her. She died in Orange County sometime before November 1864.… Read More

Meredith Edwards was born in Bedford County, Virginia in about 1775. The son of a Revolutionary War veteran, he later resided in Floyd County, Kentucky, where he died in 1849.

Richard Edwards was a resident of colonial Johnston County. In an undated petition, he joined others in asking royal governor Arthur Dobbs to appoint another justice to serve their section of the county.

Robert Logan Edwards was born on May 10, 1882, in Gaston County, North Carolina. He was a career textile laborer and took part in a labor dispute at Avon Mill in Gastonia in 1920. He died on October 4, 1946, in that same town.

Ruth Crabtree was born in Virginia in about 1752. In the spring of 1770 she married John Edwards in Bedford County, Virginia. By the time of the American Revolution, Ruth and John Edwards had four children together. While her husband was away… Read More

Sarah "Sally" Edwards was born in in Bedford County, Virginia in about 1773. She moved with her family to Buncombe County (later Yancey), North Carolina in about 1790. Any further records about this individual have not been located.

Thomas Edwards was a lawyer in Wake County, North Carolina. In 1838 he helped Rachel Locus, a free woman of color, successfully apply for a widow's pension. However, in 1839 Rachel Locus accused Edwards of fraudulently using the pension… Read More

Thomas H. Edwards was born in Orange County, North Carolina on January 11, 1830. A Methodist minister, he married Louisa M. Daniel in 1856 and the couple had three children together. After Louisa died sometime before November 1864, Edwards went… Read More

Titus Edwards was a resident of Bertie County. In 1778 he signed an oath swearing his allegiance to the State of North Carolina and promised to report any treasonous conspiracies that might threaten North Carolina's independence.

William Edwards is likely a male relation of John Edwards. His statement suggests that he was a resident of Bedford County, Virginia during the time of the American Revolution who was residing in Washington County, Tennessee by 1830. William… Read More

William Edwards Jr. was born in Bedford County, Virginia in 1771. The son of a Revolutionary War veteran, he assisted his mother in trying to obtain a widow's pension and resided in Yancey County, North Carolina as a farmer. He died in Yancey… Read More

Joseph H. Eelbeck (d. c1792) was a resident of Chowan County. In 1778 he signed an oath swearing his allegiance to the State of North Carolina and promised to report any treasonous conspiracies that might threaten North Carolina's independence.… Read More

John Egan was a resident of Chowan County. In 1778 he signed an oath swearing his allegiance to the State of North Carolina and promised to report any treasonous conspiracies that might threaten North Carolina's independence. Later in 1779 he… Read More

Robert Egan (d. 1796) was a resident of Chowan County. In 1778 he signed an oath swearing his allegiance to the State of North Carolina and promised to report any treasonous conspiracies that might threaten North Carolina's independence.

Benjamin Egerton was a resident in colonial North Carolina. Around 1763, he joined others in signing a letter of petition to royal governor Arthur Dobbs on behalf of William Strother, who had been accused of horse stealing.

James Egerton was a resident in colonial North Carolina. Around 1763, he joined others in signing a letter of petition to royal governor Arthur Dobbs on behalf of William Strother, who had been accused of horse stealing.

John Egerton was a resident in colonial North Carolina. Around 1763, he joined others in signing a letter of petition to royal governor Arthur Dobbs on behalf of William Strother, who had been accused of horse stealing.

William Egerton was a resident of Chowan County, North Carolina. In 1722 he served on a jury that heard the trial of John Cope, an American Indian man who had been charged with burglary and trespassing. He died sometime after 1728.

Patrick Eggerton was a resident of Perquimans Precinct. In 1705 he served on a jury that considered an indentured American Indian man named Sanders' freedom suit against Juliana Laker. Present in Perquimans until 1713, he may have later moved to… Read More

Abraham Elberson was a resident of Chowan County. In 1778 he signed an oath swearing his allegiance to the State of North Carolina and promised to report any treasonous conspiracies that might threaten North Carolina's independence. Later in 1779… Read More

Benjamin Trollinger Elder was born on January 31, 1871, in Alamance County, North Carolina. A longtime resident of Burlington, Elder was an agent for the Life Insurance Company of Virginia. He died in Burlington on December 13, 1922.